Welcome To Nick's Garden Center & Farm Market!

 

NICK'S GARDEN CENTER & FARM MARKET

2001 South Chambers Road * Aurora, CO 80014 * (303) 696-6657

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 Nick's is Open! 
 Open Daily from 9am to 5pm  

 

CLICK HERE TO CONTACT US!


nicks valentines day 2016


Welcome To Nick's Garden Center & Farm Market!

Throughout the year we strive to create a pleasant and friendly environment offering you a well-rounded customer experience. In 2012 we celebrated our 25th year in business and we thank you our wonderful customers for supporting us through the years. Nick’s looks forward to serving you for years to come with all your gardening needs and offering you a place to enjoy Colorado’s beautiful seasons.

Nick's Featured Products


Air Plants ARE INTERESTING & VERSATILE PLANTS!

THESE TROPICAL "AIR PLANTS" (EPIPHYTES) ARE IN THE BROMELIAD FAMILY, GENUS TILLANDSIA. THEY ARE FIRST COUSIN TO SPANISH MOSS; IN THEIR NATIVE HABITAT THEY LIVE IN THE TREETOPS, OFTEN AMONG FERNS AND ORCHIDS.

Good air circulation and bright filtered light are essential to their environment. Their food comes from dead leaves, bark, and insect droppings that fall into the rainwater stored in the center "cup" of the plant. As it all decays, the nutrients are absorbed by the leaves; the roots are used only for clinging to the bark

Air plants may be wired or stapled to a piece of wood, or glued to any surface using Liquid Nails or a silicone-based glue. They also grow well in coral or lava-rock, or can be potted in any container using bark, moss or twigs. They should be firmly attached or wedged in order to take root, and cannot be sitting in constant moisture as this will rot the plant.

When grown indoors, air plants need a drenching mist twice a week or a good soaking once a week. Completely sub-merge the plant for a while - even over-night is OK. If they're kept in a container with no drain-holes, shake excess water off of the plants, or turn container upside down to get rid of any standing water so the plant won't rot. Never use chlorinated water, or water that goes through a softener. Rain-water is the best - they love to be outsideuse city water; let it stand overnight so the chlorine evaporates before using it.

Air plants need bright filtered light, and should be shaded from the hot summer sun. These are tropical plants; they will thrive with no attention hanging under a tree for the summer, but must be moved indoors before the first frost. While inside with either heat or air-conditioning on, you may need to water them more often. Be sure to keep them out of the direct draft from the vents. During the winter, take your plants outside on warm days (55 F); protect them from cold winds, but let them get some fresh air. Full sun in the winter won't hurt them.

To keep your Bromeliads healthy, fertilize once a month (half-strength), or use a small amount of fertilizer every time you water. Use any water-soluble plant food such as Jack's Classic or Miracle-Gro - mix half-strength with water and spray-mist all over the plant, or use it in the soaking water. If you need an insecticide or fungicide, wet table powder is the best, and use at half-strength.

Bromeliads bloom when full-grown, and then produce young plants ("pups") from among the leaves. Separate the pups when half the size of the mother plant; pot in sphagnum moss until roots start growing, then mount them if you like. The mother plant will slowly die, but can produce up to a dozen pups.

Bromeliads are most interesting and versatile plants. In deciding on arrangements, you are limitedonly by your imagination! during a summer rain! Otherwise you can use well-water or distilled water... if you must...

Common varieties of Air Plants Nick's carries include; Cacticola Spiral, Tectorum Ecuador, Bulbosa Guatemala, Xerographica Mini, Straminea Tillandsia, Hondurensis Tillandsia, Baileyi, Concolor x Capitata, Tricolor Meloncrator.


House plants for Indoor Air Quality

Nick’s Garden Center and Farm Market offers a great selection of houseplants throughout the year. House plants can soften an interior space adding a piece of nature where you work and dwell. Not only does this loving art provide a comforting aesthetic but many actually clean the air in  your interior space by releasing oxygen. Stop by and see our great selection and let us help you find the perfect plant for your space.


HOW TO PLANT A TERRARIUM

If you can’t wait until the weather warms to get your hands in the soil, why not stretch your green thumb indoors by planting a terrarium? Gardeners have enjoyed tinkering with tiny terrarium plants for thousands of years, beginning with the ancient Greeks. They started the trend of planting these miniature gardens so they could bring a bit of the natural world inside.

A true terrarium is a small indoor garden that’s planted in a tightly closed transparent container. Plants in terrariums need watering less often than typical houseplants because the container traps moist air inside. Terrariums can be open containers, too, but these require a more regular watering schedule.

Any clear glass or plastic container can be turned into a terrarium. There are specially-designed, ornamental terrariums that look like doll-sized Victorian greenhouses or you can use any large glass or plastic bottle, one-gallon Mason jar, goldfish bowl, recycled fish aquarium, old glass coffee pot, brandy snifter or other creative options. Finding the right container is part of the fun.

If you’re starting with your first terrarium, look for a container with a large opening to make planting easier. Those more experienced with planting terrariums test their skill using deeper containers with smaller openings and improvising special long-handled tools for planting.

Once you find the perfect container, clean it thoroughly. Wash with hot soapy water, rinse and allow to dry. Then you’ll need to use a spoon or trowel to place several layers of material on the bottom of the container to allow for drainage. The drainage material and growing medium usually take up about one-quarter of the container.

The recommended bottom layer is about one-inch of gravel, followed by a half-inch layer of activated or horticultural charcoal. The charcoal helps remove toxins and harmful chemicals to keep plants healthy, plus it absorbs odors. Cover the layer of charcoal with sphagnum moss to keep the growing medium from mixing with the drainage area.

If you skip the charcoal layer, be sure to add a thicker layer of gravel to make up for the lack of charcoal. Use distilled water for watering plants to avoid the chemicals in treated tap water. You can also remove the lid from your terrarium to allow air to circulate several hours every day. The terrarium may need slightly more watering with this method.

Another alternative to charcoal is to replace that layer with a layer of live moss. If you use moss, be sure to give it some air by opening the terrarium for a few hours daily.

The growing medium is the next layer. Purchase a packaged soilless potting mix that’s made up of peat moss, vermiculite and perlite or use a sterile potting soil. Moisten the mix slightly before adding about 1 to 2 inches to the container.

Now decide how you’ll display the container. Will it be seen from one side, two sides or all sides? Knowing how you’ll enjoy looking at the terrarium will help you with planting. If the view is from the front, place taller plants in the back and smaller ones in front; if you want to see the garden from all sides, place taller plants in the middle surrounded by smaller, low-growing plants.

Selecting plants for your terrarium is as important as selecting plants for your landscape. Look for plants in different sizes and textures that have similar needs for light, temperature, and water. Avoid mixing plants with extremely different needs such as planting a cactus with tropical plants. Think about planting one special or unusual plant as a focal point, just as you would outside.

There are many attractive terrarium plants on the market, so you can create the kind of indoor garden that matches your taste. Look for plants that like a moist environment, like tiny ferns, baby maidenhair, sedums and mosses, just to name a few. Plants sold for use in fairy gardens are perfect for terrariums, too.

Before planting, arrange the plants in an area similar in size to your container. It’s easier to move plants around while you’re thinking about placement, than it is to move them after planting.

When you’re ready to plant, trim damaged or yellowed leaves, remove each plant from its container, brush off excess soil, and place roots in the growing medium. Keep plants away from the sides of the container so they won’t be touching the glass.

Fill in the planting hole with the potting mix and tamp it down a bit. Take your time and continue planting until you’re pleased with the final result. Add other decorative items to the terrarium, such as polished stones, bark, ceramic woodland critters or other embellishments.

Use a mister to gently mist all the foliage and growing medium; leave the lid off the terrarium for a day. Then mist again, allow leaves to dry and cover. Keep an eye on the terrarium over the next week to make sure there’s enough moisture, and add a small amount of water if you see signs of wilting.

Once planted, your miniature indoor garden should give you as much pleasure as your outdoor garden, without any heavy lifting.


CLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT OUR PLANT DATABASE!

  • How to Care for Blooming Houseplants

    How to Care for Blooming Houseplants

    December 11, 2015
    We all know how blooming houseplants add color and interest to our living space, but they perform an important function, too. They help filter common toxins from the air to improve indoor air quality. That’s especially valuable during winter when we spend more time inside.

    If you’re hesitant to add some flowering houseplants to your home, because you think they’re too difficult to care for – think again. All houseplants have the same basic needs, but each type of flowering houseplant has specific needs. Knowing the specifics takes the mystery out of caring for them. Meet their needs, and houseplants will thank you with healthy green leaves and flowers. 

    Here are the top 12 blooming houseplants and their preferred kind of light, temperature, moisture requirements and fertilizer needs. If the plant is in a foil-wrapped container, remove the wrapping or poke holes in the bottom for drainage and place container on a saucer to catch excess water...

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  • Gardening Checklist for December

    Gardening Checklist for December

    December 4, 2015
    Have you thought about planting a living Christmas tree this season? If so, you’ll be able to enjoy the tree for years after the holiday. When you buy a living Christmas tree, plan for it to be indoors for only 5-7 days at the most. Keep it in the garage until it’s time to bring it inside, place it in the coolest part of the house, and keep it watered. Decorate with light-weight ornaments and miniature lights only. After the holiday, plant it as soon as possible.

    Here are other ways to help make your season bright:

    Give flowering houseplants as holiday and hostess gifts (and buy a few for you, too). To make a special impression, look for blooming seasonal plants that will last into the New Year. Red and white cyclamen plants, colorful hydrangeas, Christmas cacti, and Norfolk pine trees add extra joy and color this time of year...

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    How To Grow African Violets

    November 27, 2015
    A small container of African violets is one of the easiest ways to add some greenery to your indoor scenery. With their long-lasting colorful flowers, it’s no wonder African violets are some of the most popular house plants around.

    African violets may look like their namesake – and they do come from Africa – but they aren’t true violets. Their botanical name is Saintpaulia ionantha and they originated from a different family of low-growing flowering plants.

    African violets feature rounded, velvety leaves and dainty flowers that range in color from traditional violet to blue, white, purple, red and soft pink. The flowers, with their bright yellow stamens, can be single, double or feature fanciful ruffles...

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  • How To Force Paperwhite Bulbs

    How To Force Paperwhite Bulbs

    November 13, 2015
    Few things are as cheery as fragrant Paperwhite Narcissus blooming indoors. These delicate-looking bright white flowers are a distant relative of daffodils, and gardeners have enjoyed forcing them to bloom for generations. One of the reasons Paperwhites are a favorite is they require little care to achieve beautiful results.

    The fragrant flowers grow on long stems above tall graceful green leaves. If you plant Paperwhite bulbs in early December—or give them as a holiday gift—they’ll bloom for up to six weeks. Continue planting in succession every few weeks and you’ll be able to enjoy these flowers during the coldest, darkest days of winter.

    Just about any container can be used to force Paperwhite bulbs, as long as it doesn’t have drainage holes. The bulbs can be grown in small pots, tall vases, terra-cotta containers or in a simple bowl with water and a layer of gravel, pebbles, marbles or small decorative stones...

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  • NOVEMBER GARDENING CHECKLIST

    November Gardening Checklist

    November 1, 2015
    Now’s the time to finish up the last outside garden details before moving your gardening indoors. November is a good time to buy a bunch of flower bulbs and use them for forcing blooms inside. Flowers like tulips, crocus, hyacinth, daffodil, paper whites and amaryllis provide added color over winter.

    Here are a few other gardening ideas to keep you busy this month:

    Scoop up any remaining pumpkins, colorful squashes and decorative gourds for decorating the Thanksgiving table. Get the kids involved in making a scarecrow to help the vegetable garden look less empty.

    Buy a roll or two of tree wrap and take time to wrap the trunks of young deciduous trees to protect them from harsh winter sun and wind....

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  • Getting The Garden Ready For Winter

    Getting The Garden Ready For Winter

    OCTOBER 10, 2015
    When the first wave of cold weather hits, it’s tempting to quietly close the door on the garden. But hardy gardeners know it’s still too soon to stop for the season. Cold temperatures are simply nature’s way of reminding us a few good gardening days remain.

    Instead of  avoiding the landscape in fall, consider this time of year as the first step toward a healthy garden next spring. The more you can tackle now, the less you’ll have to do next season.

    For the vegetable garden it's important to remove all the dead plants, vines and leaves because insect pests and plant diseases can overwinter in garden debris. If powdery mildew or other plant diseases showed up in your garden this year, be especially thorough with the garden clean-up to prevent problems next season...

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  • Gardening Checklist For October

    Gardening Checklist For October

    October 1, 2015
    October is the time when my garden slows down, and so do I. The cooler weather and slower pace always remind me of James Whitcomb Riley’s cheery old fall poem called “When the Frost is on the Punkin.” This poem is a good reminder to stock up on pumpkins and other colorful gourds for the season ahead. Here are a few other ways to make the most of October:

    Enjoy Jack-o’-lanterns longer. If you want to keep your Halloween Jack-o’-lantern from shriveling before the holiday, delay cutting it until late in the month. Then coat the inside and outside with petroleum jelly to keep it looking fresher longer.
     
    Keep preserving. The garden, so lush and green just weeks ago, is fading fast. Save as much from the garden as you can. Dry or freeze culinary herbs, save favorite vegetable and flower seeds and preserve vegetables by freezing, canning or dehydrating. Buy roasted chile peppers and red chile ristras to enjoy in flavorful recipes all winter...

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  • Fall Planting for Color

    Fall Planting for Color

    September 23, 2015
    It was such a cool wet spring leading into a cool start to summer, that the pansies in my garden lasted into July. Now that’s how to get a lot of bang for the fall-planting buck.

    While I can’t always count on pansies to last that long into summer, I can count on them to be cold-hardy plants that are much tougher than their wimpy name suggests.

    Pansies grow best when planted in the fall in a garden spot that’s shaded from the sun. Plant now and they’ll offer nice fall color while setting roots before the soil freezes. During extended warm weather into late fall, pansies will continue to bloom.

    In spring, you’ll be rewarded for your fall-planting efforts when these cheery flowers pop up again...

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  • Late Summer Lawn Care 2015

    Late Summer Lawn Care 2015

    September 16, 2015
    If you’re happy that lawn-care season is almost over, think again. The most important lawn care of the entire year should happen in late summer and early fall.

    Right now is the best time to get your lawn in good shape so it can weather the winter and emerge thick and healthy next spring.

    Here are the top 7 ways to help tackle the turf:

    1. Core aerate the lawn. Even if you aerated in spring, schedule another core aeration date, and be sure to water the lawn a day or two before aerating. Aerating with a machine that pulls plugs from the lawn will help reduce problems with thatch or fungal diseases and loosen up compacted soil...

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  • Plant New Shrubs, Perennials And Trees

    Plant New Shrubs, Perennials And Trees

    September 9, 2015
    Many annual plants start to look a little ragged by August—just like the gardeners who tend them. So this is a perfect time to give annual flower containers a little pick-me-up so they’ll look good until it’s time to put the garden to bed.

    Here are some top tips for refreshing your annual container display:

    Remove annuals that are past their prime. Some plants just fall apart in summer heat and can’t be revived to their former glory. Use a trowel to carefully lift plants from the container and toss on the compost pile.

    Fill in bare spots. If containers look a little lean, add some new plants. Late season annuals will carry the garden through the fall. Look for marigolds, cosmos, zinnia or fill in with...

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  • Gardening Checklist For September

    Gardening Checklist For September

    September 2, 2015
    Many annual plants start to look a little ragged by August—just like the gardeners who tend them. So this is a perfect time to give annual flower containers a little pick-me-up so they’ll look good until it’s time to put the garden to bed.

    Here are some top tips for refreshing your annual container display:

    Remove annuals that are past their prime. Some plants just fall apart in summer heat and can’t be revived to their former glory. Use a trowel to carefully lift plants from the container and toss on the compost pile.

    Fill in bare spots. If containers look a little lean, add some new plants. Late season annuals will carry the garden through the fall. Look for marigolds, cosmos, zinnia or fill in with...

    Read more

  • Time to Refresh Tired Containers

    Time to Refresh Tired Containers

    August 26, 2015
    Many annual plants start to look a little ragged by August—just like the gardeners who tend them. So this is a perfect time to give annual flower containers a little pick-me-up so they’ll look good until it’s time to put the garden to bed.

    Here are some top tips for refreshing your annual container display:

    Remove annuals that are past their prime. Some plants just fall apart in summer heat and can’t be revived to their former glory. Use a trowel to carefully lift plants from the container and toss on the compost pile.

    Fill in bare spots. If containers look a little lean, add some new plants. Late season annuals will carry the garden through the fall. Look for marigolds, cosmos, zinnia or fill in with...

    Read more

  • Solving Tomato Problems

    Solving Tomato Problems

    August 19, 2015
    If you’ve struggled with your tomato crop this season, raise your hand.

    It’s been a tough tomato-growing year because of the long months of cool, wet weather. Tomatoes are tropical plants and they grow best with warm temperatures during the day that carry over into night.

    This season tomato crops may mature later than usual, so let’s hope for a few more months of warm weather into fall. Until then, here are some common tomato problems you might see in your vegetable garden and what to do about them: Leaf problems: Leaves are curled with purple veins? The plant may be infested with psyllids, tiny insects that feed on the plants...

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  • Keeping Plants Healthy While You`re Away

    Keeping Plants Healthy While You’re Away

    August 12, 2015
    Some gardeners refuse to take a vacation in summer because they don’t want to leave their yard and garden. Other gardeners can’t wait to take a break from the constant pressure of keeping up, so they hang it up before the season is over.

    Then there are the gardeners who plan ahead for leaving the garden for a week or so to enjoy a change of summer scenery.

    Those clever gardeners have devised ways to make sure the garden is in good shape when they get home. Here are some of their top suggestions, starting with the easiest first...

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  • Gardening Checklist For August

    Gardening Checklist For August

    August 5, 2015
    The meteorologists are predicting a somewhat wetter-than-average August. That shouldn’t surprise gardeners one bit because that’s been the pattern ever since our Mother’s Day snowstorm. Instead of sulking about it, let’s embrace it. Here’s how to make the most of the garden this month:

    Patrol for insect pests. Cooler, wetter weather seems to have increased the number of insect pests. Check containers and garden beds for slugs every morning, remove and dispose. Treat plants by sprinkling diatomaceous earth on leaves and the soil around stems. Reapply after rain...

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  • What’s Great About Biennial Plants?

    What’s Great About Biennial Plants?

    JULY 28, 2015
    Biennials are the perfect plant for gardeners who like to go to seed.

    Less predictable than a perennial and longer lasting than an annual, ornamental biennials are one of the best investments a gardener can make.

    Biennials are plants that have a two-year growth cycle. During the first year, the plants are busy establishing leaves and roots. Flowers are produced the second year after which the plant usually dies. However, because some biennials are such prolific self-seeders, they seem to grow on forever. Flowers, weeds, herbs and even vegetables can be biennial. Each is just a different category of plant...

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  • Using Irises In The Landscape

    Using Irises In The Landscape

    JULY 21, 2015
    Among the many pleasures of a landscape is the sound of water rushing over rocks. That’s why every garden, no matter how small, should have some kind of water feature. That feature can be as simple as a portable fountain sitting on the balcony or a dream-come-true backyard pond with a stream, waterfalls and colorful koi.

    A portable fountain is one of the simplest solutions I’ve found to add the sound of water to my patio garden. The fountain is a self-contained concrete unit with an electric pump and four waterfalls. Of course, there are simpler designs made from other materials, like metal, terracotta or stone. You can even make a fountain or miniature water garden out of a whiskey barrel with a thick liner....

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  • Water Gardening Basics

    Water Gardening Basics

    JULY 17, 2015
    Among the many pleasures of a landscape is the sound of water rushing over rocks. That’s why every garden, no matter how small, should have some kind of water feature. That feature can be as simple as a portable fountain sitting on the balcony or a dream-come-true backyard pond with a stream, waterfalls and colorful koi.

    A portable fountain is one of the simplest solutions I’ve found to add the sound of water to my patio garden. The fountain is a self-contained concrete unit with an electric pump and four waterfalls. Of course, there are simpler designs made from other materials, like metal, terracotta or stone. You can even make a fountain or miniature water garden out of a whiskey barrel with a thick liner....

    Read more

  • Summer Lawn Maintenance

    Summer Lawn Maintenance

    JULY 14, 2015
    Summer Lawn Care  Spring’s moisture made it easy to take lawn care for granted, but mid-summer is the time when lawns need us the most. Now that temperatures are heating up, bluegrass lawns are starting to show some stress.

    One of the most obvious signs of turf grass problems is when brown spots show up in the lawn. Brown spots can be the result of any of these common issues:

    The turf is too dry. Dry conditions could be the result of underwatering or poor sprinkler coverage. During hot windy weather, bluegrass lawns may need over 2 inches of water each week or as much as it takes to get the soil saturated to about 6 inches deep, keeping watering restrictions in mind...

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  • Solving Summer Lawn Problems

    Solving Summer Lawn Problems

    JULY 10, 2015
    The heat is on in July and that’s when lawns, just like the folks who tend them, start to show signs of stress.
     
    Heat, dry conditions and improper mowing can weaken turf grass so much it can take lawns a year to recover.
     
    Gardeners can’t do anything about July’s high temperatures, but we should try to control all we can when it comes to our lawns.
     
    The best way to solve summer lawn problems is to prevent them in the first place...

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  • Gardening Checklist For July

    Gardening Checklist For July

    JULY 3, 2015
    Summer is here—finally! Now that the frenzied planting has slowed, July is the time to really enjoy the garden and landscape. Start the month with a bang on the Fourth and then take advantage of all the warm, wonderful days to admire your handiwork.
     
    Before you begin these gardening tasks for July, slather on the sunscreen and keep a water bottle handy. Be sure to get an early start before the heat of the day sets in.
     
    Give a gnome a home. Add a little whimsical art to your garden with a thoughtful gnome or other statuary. Transform that empty garden spot with a fairy or dragon; a bird or bunny. There’s sure to be a piece of garden art to match your garden’s special style.

    Read more

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