Welcome To Nick's Garden Center <br/>& Farm Market!

 

 NICK'S GARDEN CENTER
  & FARM MARKET 

 2001 S. Chambers Rd * Aurora, CO 80014 * (303) 696-6657 

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 open Mon-Sat: 8am-5pm & Sundays from 9AM-5PM 

 

  • How to Grow Bonsai Trees

    How to Grow Bonsai Trees

    JANUARY 15, 2017
    Bonsai is the art of finely-sculpting miniature trees to recreate how they appear in their natural setting. It’s a hobby suited for any gardener who enjoys spending time nurturing plants. Unlike a typical houseplant that needs intermittent care, bonsai trees need a few minutes of attention on a regular basis.

    That’s because these miniaturized trees are planted in shallow pots where soil can dry quickly. But with attention to detail, bonsai trees can live to be more than 100 years old. 

    To see some fine examples of beautiful bonsai exhibits, take a stroll through the Bill Hosokawa Bonsai Pavilion at the Denver Botanic Gardens. When the weather warms in late spring, the trees move from the greenhouse to outside for the summer. This bonsai collection is especially relevant because it includes Colorado native species, like Ponderosa pine, Aspen and Colorado Blue spruce, some over 250 years old...

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  • Garden Trends for 2017

    Garden Trends for 2017

    JANUARY 1, 2017
    There are some exciting garden trends emerging for this New Gardening Year. I’ve looked into my crystal ball and can clearly see gardening will become more than just planting the landscape or tending the garden.

    In 2017 people will still turn to gardening for exercise and a way to relax in the outdoors. But gardening will take on new meaning as individuals look for a deeper connection to their lawns, landscapes and vegetable gardens.

    First, I’ve noticed more attention is focused on creating wildlife-friendly spaces. One reason is a growing awareness about the plight of Monarch butterflies and honey bees. News reports have led to more interest in not only planting to attract wildlife, but helping to sustain it. Even non-gardeners understand how important it is to care for wild birds, bees, butterflies and other important insects...

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  • Indoor Gardening with Houseplants

    Indoor Gardening with Houseplants

    November 14, 2016
    Houseplants can be common or uncommon, and it has nothing to do with the kind of plant you choose for your space. Instead of selecting a houseplant and plunking it in a sunny spot, it’s time to rethink ways to use houseplants as part of the interior design.

    Houseplants add so much to the indoors we need to treat them like the green treasures they are. They clean the inside air to help us breathe easier, they add a sense of calm, and plants help boost our happiness quotient. Houseplants can also add style to any room in the house.

    Now’s the time to start shopping for houseplants at Nick’s to light up the indoors during winter. When browsing the houseplant aisles, pay attention to the different types of plants to imagine what will work best in your space.

    There are climbing and trailing plants, bushy and upright plants, flowering potted plants, ferns and palms, cacti and succulents, miniature trees, air plants, and pint-sized plants for dish gardens and terrariums...

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  • Succulents Make Lovely Living Ornaments

    Succulents Make Lovely Living Ornaments

    November 7, 2016
    Small-size succulents make for some of the most interesting gardening displays these days. Succulents are adaptable to a variety of conditions, and with their thick fleshy leaves and stems they’re known for being drought-tolerant. Succulents are also popular because there are so many different kinds to choose from.

    As nice as succulents are in the garden, they look equally at home indoors. Some of my favorite uses for succulents include displaying small-sized planters of mini-succulents, filling a terrarium with a selection of sculptural-looking succulents, and using them to fill a picture frame.

    With the holidays approaching, succulents make for striking hostess gifts or an out-of-the-ordinary decorating choice by creating a living wreath. A wreath made with succulents, like hens and chicks, is especially attractive and an enjoyable DIY project. To get started you’ll need a base, sphagnum moss, potting soil, plants, and some fine-gauge wire (or long pins) to hold the plants in place...

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  • Take the Fall Lawn Care Quiz

    Take the Fall Lawn Care Quiz

    OCTOBER 10, 2016
    The season may have changed from summer to fall, but that’s no excuse to stop taking care of your lawn for the year. There’s still some care bluegrass lawns need before they go dormant for the winter. Take this True or False quiz to test your fall lawn care knowledge. Then check your answers to see what your lawn needs before the snow starts to fly.
    1. Lawns require less water in fall, so there’s no need to keep watering. True or False?
    2. Fall is the time to treat the lawn for broadleaf weeds, like dandelions. True or False?
    3. The last lawn fertilizing of the season is the most important one of the year. True or False?
    4. Fall is the worst time of the year to reseed or renovate a bluegrass lawn. True or False?
    5. The best fertilizer for a fall lawn feeding is one that’s high in nitrogen. True or False?
    6. Fertilizer can be applied anytime in fall, even after the lawn has turned brown. True or False?
    7. Core aerating a lawn is best when done only in spring. True or False?
    8. Fall fertilizing gives turfgrass roots the energy they need to survive the winter. True or False?
    9. Once the ground freezes, there’s no need to water in the winter. True or False?
    10. Fall fertilizing helps lawns green up sooner in spring. True or False?...

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  • Stock up on Winter Squashes

    Stock up on Winter Squashes

    OCTOBER 3, 2016
    October is the best time of year to shop for great gobs of gourds. Buy plenty so you can have them on hand to enjoy during the cold winter months. Pumpkins are the most popular of the winter squashes, but most folks use those just for decorating or carving. While you’re shopping, be sure to pick up a few sugar or pie pumpkins to use for cooking, stuffing and baking.

    There’s a wonderful world of winter squashes available and now’s the time to stock up for the season. There are at least a dozen kinds of squashes at Nick’s Farm Market to use for decorating and for delicious eating.

    Many gardeners grow winter squashes in their vegetable gardens, but most varieties take about twice as long to grow as summer squashes. They also take up more space in the garden, so there’s a limit to the numbers of winter squashes gardeners grow.

    Mature winter squashes are perfect for storing for the long term because they’ve been cured to have a tough outer skin. When you shop for a winter squash, look for one that’s colorful, heavy for its size and with a hard rind. Avoid squashes without a stem or those that have blemishes or soft spots because they won’t keep as long when stored in a cool, dry space...

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  • Plant Now for Great Garlic

    Plant Now for Great Garlic

    September 26, 2016
    If you’re wondering what to plant in September, the better question is what can’t you plant this month?

    September is an ideal time for planting trees, shrubs, perennials, vegetables, herbs, and even some annuals. There are a few plants that will grow better when planted in spring, such as fall-blooming and heat-loving plants. You may want to avoid planting evergreen trees, too, because their needles can lose too much moisture during the winter causing problems when trees start regrowing in spring.

    Here are some planting ideas to make the most of your September garden:

    Buy spring-blooming bulbs now for planting through fall. For a long-lasting display next spring, buy bulbs with a range of bloom times. Crocuses and snowdrops usually appear first, followed by early varieties of daffodils and tulips, and then hyacinths. If you want to feel especially springy next year, plant mid-season and late-season bulbs, too...

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  • Recipe for Perfect Fall Containers

    Recipe for Perfect Fall Containers

    September 19, 2016
    September signals the changing of the seasons, and one of the best ways to transition into fall is by changing out summer container plantings. It’s time to replace those tired pink petunias with more seasonal offerings.

    It’s easy to create a perfect fall container if you follow this simple recipe: Take one part fall flowers in complementary colors, mix in plants with attractive textures and plant tightly in an autumn-like container. Finish your fall container by garnishing with some of the bounty of available fruits and vegetables.

    Now, let’s get cooking: First, choose a color palette for your fall container. Decide whether you’d like a warm look with reds, oranges and yellows or a cool container with purples, blues and whites.

    Second, decide on a container. Whether an urn, squatty square container or pumpkin-shaped pot, the most attractive plantings are those that match the look of the container. Choose a container that will fit its surroundings from September through November...

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  • When to Harvest your Vegetables

    When to Harvest your Vegetables

    September 12, 2016
    It was late summer a few years ago when one of my gardening friends asked what sounded like a silly question. “How do you know when it’s time to pick green tomatoes?”

    She was talking about the tomato varieties that are naturally green, like Green Grape, Aunt Ruby’s German Green, and Green Zebra.

    It’s easier to time the green-tomato harvest if you know what to look for. Green tomatoes are ripe when they turn from bright green to a deeper color of green with hints of yellow or amber.

    It’s important to know when to harvest fruits and vegetables for several reasons. If left on the plant too long, fruits and vegetables will become over-ripe and lose their fresh flavor. Another reason is when fruits are left on the plant too long, the plant starts setting seed and stops producing new fruits...

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  • WHAT TO PLANT IN SEPTEMBER

    What to Plant in September

    September 5, 2016
    If you’re wondering what to plant in September, the better question is what can’t you plant this month?

    September is an ideal time for planting trees, shrubs, perennials, vegetables, herbs, and even some annuals. There are a few plants that will grow better when planted in spring, such as fall-blooming and heat-loving plants. You may want to avoid planting evergreen trees, too, because their needles can lose too much moisture during the winter causing problems when trees start regrowing in spring.

    Here are some planting ideas to make the most of your September garden:

    Buy spring-blooming bulbs now for planting through fall. For a long-lasting display next spring, buy bulbs with a range of bloom times. Crocuses and snowdrops usually appear first, followed by early varieties of daffodils and tulips, and then hyacinths. If you want to feel especially springy next year, plant mid-season and late-season bulbs, too...

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  • Solving Summer Garden Problems

    Solving Summer Garden Problems

    AUGUST 26, 2016
    GThis summer certainly has been tough on the landscape. Strings of 90-degree heat, low humidity and the lack of reliable precipitation have taken their toll on plants and gardeners alike.

    Even though we may want instant results, it takes time and patience to solve some of summer’s lawn and garden problems. The most important step in the problem-solving process is to diagnose the problem correctly. An incorrect diagnosis can lead to even more problems.

    For example, many lawn issues can look similar, but have different causes. That patch of dead grass on the front lawn could be caused by a lack of water, insect damage, a fungus or a dog spot.

    If you’re seeing problems in your bluegrass lawn right now, it might be a fungus called summer patch. Sometimes summer patch starts as small circles of dead grass or larger patches that seem to appear overnight...

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  • Save Energy and Money With Plants

    Save Energy and Money With Plants

    AUGUST 19, 2016
    It’s been a hot summer and the heat’s still on. Everyone I know is trying to find ways to stay cool, but running the AC all day means higher energy costs. One solution is to plant more trees, shrubs and vines to help with cooling.

    Planting for beauty is one thing, but the shade that trees produce is more valuable than you think. Some experts estimate by strategically planting just three shade trees, you can save up to $250 a year in energy costs.

    In addition to planting shade trees, there are other ways plants can help reduce energy costs. Here are some ideas for putting plants to work for you:
    • Plant shade trees on the south side of the house to provide the most shade in summer and warmth from the sun in winter.
    • Use dense evergreens, planted on the north and northwest sides of the house or other structures as windbreaks to also help reduce cooling costs.
    • Landscape so trees, vines and shrubs shade driveways, courtyards, and large windows.
    • Allow at least one foot between the house and the plants to add an extra layer of insulation...

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  • Summer Tips For Tomatoes

    Summer Tips For Tomatoes

    AUGUST 12, 2016
    Gardeners start the season with such high hopes for growing bushels of beautiful tomatoes. Then August hits and we’re reminded that tomatoes can sometimes be challenging to grow.

    Often the problem is obvious, like when a hungry squirrel eats half a ripe tomato right off the vine. Other times, the problems come from plant diseases or insect pests.

    Here are some common tomato problems for this time of year, and what to do about them:

    Plants are wilting. Sometimes wilting is because plants need water and other times it’s because tomatoes are being overwatered. Before watering plants, be sure to check to make sure the first inch or two of soil is dry. If plants start to wilt in the middle of the day, even when the soil is moist, the problem may be a soil-borne fungal disease like verticillium wilt or fusarium wilt. Pull up plants that don’t recover and dispose of them in the trash.

    Damage on tomatoes. When you see problems starting on the tomatoes, pick those fruits and toss them on the compost pile. There’s no reason to leave wormy fruit or tomatoes with blossom end rot on the plant because it takes energy away from forming other tomatoes...

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  • WHAT TO PLANT NOW - AUGUST

    What to Plant Now - August

    AUGUST 5, 2016
    August seems like the time when some gardeners start to let gardening tasks slip. But don’t give up yet! There’s still time to get out and enjoy the garden while summer is in full swing. Keep pulling those weeds and watering those plants. If your landscape is starting to look a little droopy, perk it up with some new plantings.

    Here’s what you can do in the garden this month:

    Remember to plant biennials. Biennial plants, like hollyhocks, can be planted now so they have time to start growing and set good roots before the ground freezes. They’ll start regrowing next spring, ready to bloom.

    Search for shrubs. Take a walk around your yard and look for places that could use a new shrub or two. If you want to see your landscape in a new way, set your camera to black and white to take a few photos. By taking the color out of the picture, you’ll be able to see blank spots or what plant sizes and shapes are missing from the landscape...

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  • Protect Pollinators With Safe Pesticide Use

    Protect Pollinators With Safe Pesticide Use

    July 29, 2016
    It’s not often I resort to a toxic chemical to get rid of insect pests in my garden. But when hollyhock weevils showed up again this year, I knew I had to take some drastic action.

    These weevils not only eat big gaping holes in the plant’s leaves, they use their long beaks for chewing into the flower buds so they can lay their eggs. Then the grubs feed on the seeds which can spell the end to having hollyhocks in the future.

    Last year I spent many summer mornings picking these destructive pests off the plants and crushing them with my fingers. Damaged pods had to go, too.

    So at the first sign of weevil damage this season, I decided to bring out the heavy artillery. I spent a lot of time researching pesticides before finding one that would take care of the weevils, but wouldn’t kill beneficial insects, too.

    Be observant in the garden and take action as soon as you spot a problem and before it can get worse. Some insect problems can be solved with several days of strong blasts of water from the garden hose...

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  • Shady Places are Creative Spaces

    Shady Places are Creative Spaces

    July 22, 2016
    So many insect pests, so little time to crush, drown and destroy them. July seems to be when insect pests start to show up and cause damage to garden plants. Some damage is simply cosmetic, like holes in leaves, but other insect damage can cause plants to wither and die.

    To keep your landscape and garden healthy, spend a little extra time looking for these insects and then take action to control them:

    Aphids are small pear-shaped insects that suck sap from plant leaves making them curl. If you see aphids (or groups of ants attracted to aphid infestations) dislodge with a strong stream of water from the hose every few days until they’re gone. Insecticidal soap also works to rid plants of aphids.

    Cabbage worms start as little white butterflies that lay eggs. The eggs grow into cabbage caterpillars that attack cabbage leaves. If the eggs are hatching, look for the fat caterpillars under cabbage leaves. Pick by hand and drown in a bucket of soapy water. Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) is a soil bacterium that helps control caterpillars...

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  • Summer Pest Watch

    Summer Pest Watch

    July 15, 2016
    So many insect pests, so little time to crush, drown and destroy them. July seems to be when insect pests start to show up and cause damage to garden plants. Some damage is simply cosmetic, like holes in leaves, but other insect damage can cause plants to wither and die.

    To keep your landscape and garden healthy, spend a little extra time looking for these insects and then take action to control them:

    Aphids are small pear-shaped insects that suck sap from plant leaves making them curl. If you see aphids (or groups of ants attracted to aphid infestations) dislodge with a strong stream of water from the hose every few days until they’re gone. Insecticidal soap also works to rid plants of aphids.

    Cabbage worms start as little white butterflies that lay eggs. The eggs grow into cabbage caterpillars that attack cabbage leaves. If the eggs are hatching, look for the fat caterpillars under cabbage leaves. Pick by hand and drown in a bucket of soapy water. Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) is a soil bacterium that helps control caterpillars...

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  • WHAT TO PLANT NOW - JULY

    What To Plant Now - July

    July 8, 2016
    July may seem like we’ve hit the halfway point of summer, but there’s still plenty of time for planting. Warm-season plants appreciate the heat as long as they’re planted early in the day, mulched and kept watered. A little protection from the sun for a few days, using shade cloth or row cover cloth, will help reduce transplant shock.

    Here are a few ideas for keeping gardens looking fresh with new plantings this month:

    Plant patriotically. July is a great time to celebrate the red, white and blue even if it’s after Independence Day. Stretch your garden creativity beyond petunias and look for unusual combinations of star-spangled plants for patio containers and the flower bed.

    Add perennials. If you missed out on perennial planting time in spring, plant some now. There’s still time for fall-blooming perennials to set down roots...

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  • How to Care for Summer Plants

    How to Care for Summer Plants

    July 1, 2016
    Whenever I see a color bowl of summer annuals, I always remember the one I gave as a housewarming gift to a friend. She was delighted to receive it and immediately placed it in the center of the patio table. When I reminded her that she’d have to feed and water it she responded, “I will?”

    It sounds silly, but I had to explain if she wanted that color bowl to look beautiful all summer, she’d have to take care of it. Care includes regular watering to keep the soil moist and fertilizing about every 7-10 days to keep the flowers looking their best.

    Here are more best care practices for nonstop blooms in your color bowls, hanging baskets, window boxes, patio pots and other annual plantings: Annuals need to be placed with care in your garden. The mantra of planting the right plant in the right place works as well for annuals as for perennials...

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  • Edible Fruits for Small-Space Gardens

    Edible Fruits for Small-Space Gardens

    June 24, 2016
    Serviceberry shrubs, also known as juneberries, are perfect for planting now. This native plant is a wonderful addition to landscapes in our area because it’s a hardy deciduous shrub, and it’s one of the first shrubs to bloom each spring. The clusters of white flowers show up even before the foliage.

    I planted a serviceberry several seasons ago at Nick’s and it’s brought a lot of joy to my garden. I love the look of this medium-sized shrub, but it’s especially attractive to birds. As soon as the small fruits are ripe, the birds can’t wait to start enjoying them. And I let them.

    Robins provide many hours of entertainment as they try to pick the serviceberry clean. Some stand on the ground and jump to grab the low-hanging fruit, others try to balance on the branches as they try for a berry that’s just out of reach...

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  • Father’s Day Gardening Gift Ideas

    Father’s Day Gardening Gift Ideas

    June 17, 2016
    Father’s Day should be every day, but the third Sunday in June is when Dad finally gets the recognition he deserves. It’s a terrific coincidence that the first day of summer follows soon after, giving us two great reasons to celebrate.

    If your dear old dad is the kind of guy that likes to spend his free time working in the yard, here are some great gardening gift ideas to help make his day. Father’s Day is all about giving him the kinds of gifts he wouldn’t normally get for himself.

    A garden tool bag or bucket filled with high-quality tools is a good start. Add a pair or two of good-fitting work gloves and then choose an assortment of heavy-duty hand tools that will make quick work of tough gardening tasks. Fill any extra pockets with packets of seeds; a gift card is also a thoughtful addition.

    One gift that keeps on giving is a special plant for the landscape. A flowering shrub, rose bush or a fruit-bearing tree is a long-lasting reminder of the occasion. The best part of giving a living gift is making memories as you help with the planting...

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  • What’s Wrong with My Lawn?

    What’s Wrong with My Lawn?

    May 27, 2016
    One of the most common questions gardeners ask at Nick’s Garden Center is about lawns. As in “What’s wrong with my lawn?”

    That may be the most frequently asked question, but there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer. Lawn problems can be caused by too much fertilizer or not enough; too much irrigation or not enough, insects, plant diseases, herbicides, improper mowing and more.

    Before beginning any lawn treatment, it’s important to understand the source of the problem. For example, those brown spots in the lawn could be caused by poor sprinkler coverage, too much irrigation, insect problems or damage from dog urine.

    Here are some of the most common lawn problems in our area and what to do about them...

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  • Spring Lawn Care Refresher

    Spring Lawn Care Refresher

    May 20, 2016
    One of my neighbors once remarked “if lawns look so good in spring, what happens to them by summer?”

    The short answer is most folks take their spring lawn care for granted, and then try to catch up in summer. The problem with that approach is spring lawn care is an important step to a healthy summer lawn.

    Spring lawn care actually starts in fall. The last lawn fertilizing of the season, around October, gives the spring lawn a head start. It’s the reason why some lawns green up so quickly in spring.

    If you neglected that fall fertilizing, make a point to get it on the schedule for this year...

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  • What to Plant Now - June

    What to Plant Now - June

    June 4, 2016
    Cool spring weather may have delayed some planting plans, so now’s the time to get busy. There’s still plenty of time for planting in June, and some plants even prefer warmer soil and nighttime temperatures. Here’s what to plant this month, just as summer is starting in earnest.

    Heat-loving annuals, like gaillardias, cosmos and marigolds, enjoy the early days of June. Plant on a cloudy morning or later in the day to help reduce transplant stress.

    Buy healthy trees and shrubs and plant early in the month, while daytime temperatures are still cool. Dig shallow, but wide planting holes, to give roots a good start.

    Plant warm-season fruits and vegetables from transplants, like tomatoes, eggplants and peppers.

    Plant vegetable seeds like squash and pumpkins directly in the garden. Warm weather will held them sprout faster. Plant bush beans now and then continue planting seeds every two weeks for a continuous crop of beans all season...

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  • How To Plant Dinner Plate Dahlias

    How To Plant Dinner Plate Dahlias

    May 13, 2016
    If you want to add some spectacular flowers to your garden this summer, plant dinner plate dahlias. These huge flowers grow on tall bushy plants that make a bold statement in the landscape.

    Nick Sr dahlias are a special variety that grow to the size of dinner plates with 10” ruffled petal blooms. The ruffle turns to show a creamy second color for more pizazz in the garden. These flowers are late bloomers in the garden.

    This dahlia variety was named Nick Sr, after its breeder and grower, who also shares a name with Nick Ortega, the founder of Nick’s Garden Center.

    Dahlias are popular summer-blooming flowers that are grown as a tender annual in our region. Gardeners can get many seasons of flowers when they plant these bulbs (actually dahlias are tubers) in spring and dig them up for storing in fall...

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  • What To Plant In May

    What To Plant In May

    May 6, 2016
    May weather is so unpredictable, it seems like there are three gardening seasons in the span of 31 days. Make the most of this unsettled weather by dividing the month into thirds. Plan for planting in early May, the middle of May and the end of May.

    In early May it’s still cool enough to plant transplants of cool-season vegetables like lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

    Plant trees, shrubs and container roses in early May before the weather heats up.

    Add perennial fruit crops to the landscape such as blackberries, currants, gooseberries, grapes, raspberries and goji berries. Grow blueberries in acidic soil to get the best results...

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  • How To Avoid Summer Lawn Weeds

    How To Avoid Summer Lawn Weeds

    April 28, 2016
    Some gardeners take a laissez faire or lazy approach to weedy lawns, letting nature take its course. Others prefer perfect lawns by declaring an all-out war on weeds. Then there’s the weed approach that falls somewhere in the middle – learning to live with a few weeds.

    The best way to avoid a weedy lawn is by being proactive about its care. Good lawn care practices, like core aerating, fertilizing, watering, and proper mowing, all work together to build a thick healthy lawn that prevents weeds from sprouting in the first place.

    But if your lawn is thin, drought-stressed or otherwise damaged, weeds may have already taken over. April is the time to tackle lawn weeds before they can grow, flower and go to seed. You’ve heard the old gardener’s saying haven’t you? “One year of seeds means seven years of weeds.”

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  • transplanting 400px

    Take Time For Transplanting

    April 21, 2016
    April is a good time to look around your landscape for plants ready to be transplanted. These plants are the perennial flowers, shrubs and small trees that need a more suitable space, are overgrown, crowded, or started growing in an undesirable spot.

    There are advantages to transplanting while the weather is cool and plants are still small:
    • Reduces transplant shock.
    • Makes for a healthier garden.
    • Fills in empty spaces.
    • Creates room for new plants.
    • Produces plant starts to pass along to others.

    Transplanting is a pleasant spring gardening task, and here are tips for making the process an easy one: 1. Be prepared. You’ll need containers, potting soil, and a garden trowel or shovel...

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  • arbor day 400px

    Arbor Day Tips For Planting Trees

    April 14, 2016
    April gives gardeners two opportunities to get back to our roots – Earth Day and Arbor Day. The best way to celebrate these two gardening holidays is by planting trees. 

    Early spring is the perfect time to plant trees in our region. Whether you want to add a fruit tree, shade tree or evergreen to your landscape, the cooler spring weather makes for an easier tree transition.

    The trees at Nick’s Garden Center are medium dormant, meaning they’re just beginning to come out of their dormant period and starting to grow. These are trees that are still leafless, but ready for planting...

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  • What to Plant Now

    What to Plant Now

    April 7, 2016
    It’s time to celebrate the changing of the seasons! While March is still too early to plant warm-season vegetables, there are plenty of hardy, cool-season plants to keep gardeners busy. 

    Here are some ideas to help you get started on your spring planting:

    Plant an assortment of colorful pansies. These hardy flowers are perfect for gardens that may still get covered with snow. But pansies will bounce right back.

    Start seeds indoors. Get a head start on the season by starting tomato, pepper and eggplant seeds inside. Flower seeds like salvia, lobelia and impatiens can also be started indoors now.

    If the weather is warm and the soil is workable, you can start planting seeds outdoors. Use a soil thermometer to make sure the soil is at least 40 degrees. Cool-season plants can take a little cold weather for early crops.

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  • seed starting part 2 400px

    How to Start Seeds - Part 2

    MARCH 27, 2016
    Gardeners in our region often start their seeds indoors to get a head start on spring planting. There’s really nothing to seed starting, if you follow a few basic steps.

    First, you’ll need a few supplies. Seeds (of course), seed starting mix, a seed starting tray or containers, a trowel, watering mister, plant labels and source of light.

    There are at least two ways to start your seeds:

    • Start seeds in ready-to-grow peat pellets.
    • Start seeds in seed trays filled with seed-starting mix.

    You can be successful with either method. Starting seeds in peat pellets means you can plant the expanded pot and transplant right into the garden. In seed trays, you may need to transplant the small plants into larger containers before moving them outside.

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  • how to start seeds part 1

    How to Start Seeds - Part 1

    MARCH 20, 2016
    Spring is in the air and gardeners can’t wait to get their hands in the soil. Now’s the time to start the seeds for the plants you want to grow this summer. The first step in starting seeds indoors can be difficult. With so many seeds to choose from, how do you decide which ones to plant?
    • Look for high-quality seeds from a reliable source.
    • Check each seed packet to ensure it was packaged for the current season.
    • Make sure the packet gives complete planting information (when to plant, how to space seeds and number of days to germination and/or days to maturity).
    • Choose seeds that match our region’s growing season.
    • Select the plants you have space for and will enjoy growing and using.
    Denver metro area gardeners have an easier time than other gardeners. We’re lucky to have several seed companies practically out our backdoor. BBB Seeds, Botanical Interests and Lake Valley Seed Company are all located in the Boulder area.

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  • year of the allium

    Plant Ornamental Alliums for Vertical Interest

    mARCH 10, 2016
    If there’s ever been a season to plant ornamental alliums, this is it. Unlike their distant cousins, garlic and shallots, gardeners grow ornamental alliums because they add vertical interest to the garden. Their long stems and perfectly round flowers look like an exclamation point in the landscape.

    These ornamentals, also called “flowering onions” not only add a new dimension to flower beds, they attract bees and butterflies like crazy. But deer and some insect pests are repelled by the sulfur-like compounds in the foliage.

    Those are just a few reasons why the National Garden Bureau awarded ornamental alliums with its special Plant of the Year designation for 2016...

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